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laura


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laura


  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Jaume Plensa

Spanish, born 1955

Laura, 2012

Macael marble, lead, and stainless steel

overall: 240 x 72 x 96 inches (609.6 x 182.88 x 243.84 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, 2012

“Laura is the portrait of a fourteen-year-old Mediterranean girl from Barcelona. Her eyes close in a dream-state position emphasizing the interior path, our world of dreams and ideas. The elongation of the head transforms the physical aspects of the portrait into a spiritual flame. I chose this girl for her classic kind of beauty. A timeless beauty.” - Plensa 

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cigarette


cigarette


Tony Smith

Tony Smith’s “Cigarette”—on view on the Elmwood Avenue side of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery—is a perfect example of the artist's trademark monumental minimalist sculptures. Smith created abstract geometric constructions that utilize simple forms to create strikingly complex compositions. The three-dimensionality of his works make them interesting to view from many different angles. The title and shape of this large outdoor steel work were inspired by the appearance of a cigarette that had been lightly puffed and ground out in an ashtray.

American, 1912-1980

Cigarette, 1961-1967

Cor-Ten steel

Edition: 1/3

overall: 180 x 216 x 312 inches (457.2 x 548.64 x 792.48 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Gift of The Seymour H. Knox Foundation, Inc., 1968

Learn more about Tony Smith here

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love


love


Robert Indiana

  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Love

Love is a pop art image by American artist Robert Indiana. It consists of the letters L and O over the letters V and E in bold Diodone type. The O is slanted sideways so that its negative space creates a line leading to the V. The original image, with green and blue spaces backing red lettering, served as a print image for a Museum of Modern Art Christmas card in 1964. In much this same form the design soon graced a popular US postage stamp.

Love's original rendering in sculpture was as made in 1970 and is displayed in Indiana at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The material is COR-TEN steel. Indiana's Love design has since been reproduced in a variety of formats for rendering in displays around the world. (Wikipedia)

“The “LOVE Sculpture” is the culmination of ten years of work based on the original premise that the word is an appropriated and usable element of art, just as Picasso and the Cubists made use of it at the beginning of the century, which evolved inevitably, in both my “LOVE” paintings and sculpture, into the concept that the word is also a fit and viable subject for art. - Robert Indiana

Learn More:

Albright Knox Art Gallery - Robert Indiana: A Sculpture Retrospective

Mr. Indiana’s famous image features the word L-O-V-E rendered in colorful capital letters, with the first two letters stacked on top of the other two, and the letter “O” tilted as if it were being swept off its feet. Since he designed the earliest versions, in the 1960s, the logo has acquired a life of its own, appearing on everything from posters and album covers to T-shirts and jewelry. - NY Times

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builttoliveanywhere


builttoliveanywhere


  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Nancy Rubins

American, born 1952

Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Monochrome I, Built to Live Anywhere, at Home Here, 2010-2011

stainless steel, stainless steel wire, and aluminum

overall: 360 x 576 x 420 inches (914.4 x 1463.04 x 1066.8 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, by exchange, Sarah Norton Goodyear Fund, Charles W. Goodyear Fund, by exchange, Virginia Leahy Duffy and Charles G. Duffy, Jr., Albert H. Tracy, Gerald S. Elliott, Charlotte A. Watson, and Irene Pirson MacDonald Funds, 2010 

Despite its huge size and its use of what some might consider unorthodox media (60-plus silver canoes), the sculpture is pure formality. It is not about boats, water, or salvage. There is no environmental message. It is a beautiful explosion of vaguely organic forms, alive with dynamic tension. Like some of the other abstract works outside of the museum, it transforms its raw materials and challenges the viewer to see the extraordinary within the ordinary.

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karma


karma


 EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Do Ho Suh

South Korean, born 1962

Karma, 2010

bronze and copper-plated steel

Edition: 1/3 plus 1 artist's proof

overall (height): 276 inches (701.04 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange, 2010

Karma, 2010, a twenty-three-foot-high, monumental bronze sculpture, appears at first to be a graceful curvature, rising up in a trajectory that defies normal structural integrity.

Closer inspection of the work reveals that is it composed of a striding human figure that carries on his shoulders a series of crouching figures, perched one on top the other. Each figure holds his hands over the eyes of the figure beneath him, as if to show that humanity's reliance on its fellow man is not only essential—we all stand on the shoulders of those who came before us—but a complete and terrifying leap of faith.

This leap of faith is especially evident in the dangerous degree to which this chain of humanity is stretching into a gravity-defying arch. 

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underlife


underlife


  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Jason Middlebrook

American, born 1966

Underlife, 2012-2013

steel, fiberglass, and tile

overall width (approximately): 360 inches (914.4 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

Bequest of Arthur B. Michael, by exchange, Sherman S. Jewett Fund, by exchange, Gift of A. Conger Goodyear, by exchange and Gift of Demotte and Company, by exchange, 2012 

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stackedrevisionstructure


stackedrevisionstructure


  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Liam Gillick

British, born 1964

Stacked Revision Structure, 2005

powder-coated aluminum

overall: 144 x 144 x 144 inches (365.76 x 365.76 x 365.76 cm)

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

George B. and Jenny R. Mathews Fund, 2005


Liam Gillick’s “Stacked Revision Structure” is a twelve-foot cube fabricated from powder-coated aluminum that was created specifically for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. A minimalist sculptor, Gillick strives to create a conversation with the architecture that surrounds his artworks. This sculpture is positioned in such a way that you can view either the classical architecture of the museum's 1905 Building or the modern architecture of its 1962 Building as a backdrop.

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eightcaryatidfigures


eightcaryatidfigures


  EagleHawk, 2018

EagleHawk, 2018

Augustus Saint-Gaudens

American, 1848-1907

Eight Caryatid Figures, 1906-1907

marble

each: 102 inches (259.08 cm) height

Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

James G. Forsyth Funds, Albright Art Gallery and the City of Buffalo, 1933 

John J. Albright commissioned Augustus Saint-Gaudens to create the eight marble figures featured on the Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s North and South Porches to complement the architectural design of the museum’s original building, which opened in 1905. While Saint-Gaudens completed the sculptures between 1906 and 1907, they weren’t permanently installed until 1934. The figures are modeled on those of the Erechtheum in Athens, and symbolize victory and the arts of painting, music, sculpture, and architecture.